Testimonial

My name is Kayleigh Summers and I am a senior at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School in Pennsauken, NJ. For the past fourteen years, my true passion has been playing soccer. During a soccer game in late September, my nose was broken in sixteen places after an opposing players’ knee slammed into my face. I was told that I wouldn’t be back on the field for 6-8 weeks, which was devastating news. I was the senior captain on the returning state championship team and to think I was out for the season was more than I could take.

Fortunately, I received a call from a member of the boys’ soccer team who told me about the possibility of getting a mask made by Mr. Jeremy Murray at Michigan Sports & Rehab Center. I was so excited that I had my mother contact Mr. Murray immediately. After that first phone call, things moved very quickly. Mr. Murray walked us through, step by step, everything we had to do in order to get me back playing. Because I live so far from Michigan, Mr. Murray researched where I could have my mask template made, while also researching the New Jersey State Athletic Association’s rules and regulations for masks. The entire process went so smoothly that I was back on the field in just 3 weeks. Mr. Murray’s instructions on wearing and adjusting the mask were thorough and easy to follow. The mask fit perfectly and I played with it for the rest of the season and throughout the playoffs.

Mr. Murray was in constant contact with my mother and me even after he knew that the mask fit. Although Mr. Murray never met me, it was obvious how much he truly cared. My senior soccer season was saved because of Mr. Murray and I can now look forward to playing at the college level. I can’t thank him enough for getting me back on the field.

Kayleigh Summers

Press Releases/News

Q & A with Jeremy Murray, CO, OTL

06-01-2012

Jeremy Murray is the director of orthotics at Michigan Hand and Sports Rehabilitation Centers (MHSRC), headquartered in Warren. The orthotics department, which Murray oversees, offers an array of orthotic services; however, his specialty is personalized protective facemasks. He has fit athletes from as far away as Russia, on individuals as young as four to as old as their mid 60s, and on all levels—from grade school, high school, college, professional, to adult recreational. While most of the masks he makes are for basketball and soccer, he has made them for cheerleading, baseball and softball, water and horse polo, martial arts, field hockey, volleyball, and more.

How did you become interested in O&P?

I pursued healthcare because of my sister, Hannah. During the birthing process she had the oxygen supply cut off to her brain (birth anoxia), which left her severely, multiply disabled. Her occupational therapist (OT) lived down the street from our home, and I shadowed her for several months. After working as an OT for a few years, I was able to work under the direction of Jerry McHale, CO, who introduced me to the orthotics profession. His knowledge of biomechanics, fabrication techniques, and attention to detail intrigued me. Further, as my patient load increased and their needs became more complicated, I found that it was not feasible to treat every problem without better exposure to a wider variety of materials and processes. I realized that as a certified orthotist I would be able to successfully treat a more varied patient population.

How has your career progressed?

I spent the first four years of my professional career working as an upper-limb rehabilitation specialist, using directmolded, low-temperature materials for patients in an outpatient, acute setting. Because of my exposure to MHSRC, I pursued and completed the educational and certification requirements to become an orthotist. Once certified, my career progressed rapidly from staff orthotist to director of orthotics in a little less than four years.

Please describe how you started creating facemasks for athletes.

I learned to make custom facemasks from Jerry McHale, who was the first person to use a custom facemask for an athletic purpose. In 1990, he fabricated a custom mask for Bill Laimbeer, who played basketball for the Detroit Pistons. The first facemask that I made was for Richard "Rip" Hamilton, who currently plays basketball for the Chicago Bulls. He has been wearing his since 2004.

What are your personal and/or professional goals?

To help make O&P a more nationally recognized and respected profession. I would also like to teach O&P at the university level. I can't think of anything more rewarding than being able to pass along the knowledge and techniques that I have developed.

What areas do you feel are currently the most underserved in terms of the O&P profession?

Upper-limb and arthritis, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There seems to be a lack of understanding of how to treat these patients. RA patients are underserved because O&P professionals lack the requisite education and rheumatologists underutilize O&P professionals. A little more education on the part of both the doctors and the clinicians could help these patients tremendously over the course of their lives.



The original article was published here on http://www.oandp.com


Our Services | Media Room | Patient Feedback | Contact Us | Resources
The masks and services displayed on this website are not endorsed, sponsored, or affiliated with the NBA